How Virginia conservatives and libertarians are working together

Passionate, headstrong, and patriotic, in the fall of 2011 I had absolutely no idea how to get involved in politics, aside from attending protests and holding signs on street corners.

Like my parents and grandparents, the extent of my political involvement was a being a registered Republican voter of Maryland. Within three years I had volunteered for no fewer than five Republican campaigns. Needless to say, after knocking on doors, making phone calls, and spending many late nights in campaign headquarters, I have learned a lot, gained friends, and created political relationships across the Commonwealth.

Yet in the beginning, I wondered “Who would possibly welcome a young libertarian upstart into a party dominated by an older, well-established generation??” Granted, party leadership was indeed excited to see the young faces of eager Ron Paul supporters. Right up until we broke the 11th commandment.

“Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.” Sounds well-intentioned, but what happens when that means supporting certain “fellow Republicans” who refuse to or can’t take a stand for the Life, Liberty and, Property of the individual? Is pointing out the hypocrisy of supporting Republican candidates who are unable to uphold Republican principles truly a damnable offense?

I have heard the question, “Why do you always attack Republicans?” I’ll let you in on a little secret: libertarians have a higher disdain for liberal politicians than conservatives and moderates do. Rest assured, from protests in the streets to duking it out on Facebook, we have made our voices heard. We have come to take our country back! What better way than to reinforce the party of our fathers? Who better to constructively criticize Republican representatives than their own constituents with fresh ideas?

But we are not alone in our criticism. Many fiscal conservatives I disagree with on social issues recognize one indisputable fact: the future of the Republican Party is in serious trouble! Attend your local GOP meeting and count the number of those under 30, heck, even 40! Of course there are a few students bolstering their resumes and taking jobs thanks to a 16% youth unemployment rate, but where are the passionate young volunteers? After being told to show up, sit down, keep quiet and do as they were told, they left. And who wouldn’t? The only youth accepting that kind of mentality voted for Obama or get paid to work for their candidates.

Conservatives and Libertarians Breaking Bread Together in Virginia Beach

Conservatives and Libertarians Breaking Bread Together in Virginia Beach

So who truly reached out those of us younger generation disillusioned with the status quo, despite our creative tantrums? Those who understand the future of the GOP lies in the hands of these young, libertarian upstarts who should be embraced and given a seat at the table. While conservatives and libertarians disagree with each other on certain issues—and there is no shortage of disagreement—that has not been a problem. We are working together to keep our party from slipping into obscurity like the Whigs or “drifting left” like the Democrats. We adhere to the Republican Creed, hold our elected representatives accountable, and fight together for that seat at the table, side by side. And we have made great progress!

In 2012, faster than Republican leadership could blink, district conventions across the state were filled with the ranks of excited libertarian activists,Tea Party patriots, and fiscal conservatives united under one banner: reform. In the race for district chairmanships, state central committee seats, and national delegates, conservatives voted for libertarians while libertarians voted for conservatives. My own 2nd district and our neighboring 3rd were prime examples of this beautiful coalition for freedom. We wanted to take the party from the consultants and corporatists, giving it back to the grassroots activists. Result of unity: Victory.

Nearly half of the delegates to the Republican National Convention represented libertarian Ron Paul, over moderate Mitt Romney. Simultaneously, our united Virginia delegation was the only to vote unanimously against the top-down philosophy rules changes that caused a huge uproar nationwide. The now grassroots-controlled state central committee put the nomination process back into the hands of the party, which had given us the winning ticket of 2009, as opposed to the hands of all registered voters (including Dems) that led to the defeat of McCain, Romney, and Allen. Unfortunately, this power shift did not go without repercussions. Bill Bolling, being sore about having to drop out of the race for governor refused to support Ken Cuccinelli and even briefly entertained the notion of running as an independent. Virginia Beach mayor William Sessoms let his membership lapse to endorse the democrat nominee (for the 4th time) and Republican consultants jumped ship, working for the biggest Democrat fundraiser: Terry McAuliffe. Result of division: Defeat.

Here in Virginia Beach the voices calling most loudly for “unity” are the same calling to seat just 32 of over 1,000 delegates filed to attend my district convention, the first organized push for slating in 30 years. So I ask you, while conservatives and libertarians are coming together for a single cause, what keeps moderates from joining us? Why don’t the self-proclaimed “party faithful” embrace the new generation? Why not come together under the banner of the Republican Creed? The future of our party literally depends on your response. Respond quickly, for time is running out.

David Dull is a libertarian Republican activists in Virginia’s Second Congressional District.

84 comments

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  • Susie Kwiatkowski

    Great questions! The future of a living limited government party will be libertarian, decentralized, and will value freedom and private property and love. The sooner the GOP gets that, the better off they will be in terms of enjoying electoral wins and an energetic membership.

  • Larsele

    If Jeb Bush is the nominee in 2016 I will be working full time on a 3rd party candidate. Enough is enough. IMHO.

    • Alexis Rose Bank

      If Jeb Bush is the nominee in 2016, it’s US Independence Party time.

    • If Jeb Bush is the nominee, then I will have to vote for the COnstitution Party for the third Presidential election in a row.

  • Laurence Nordvig

    You mention that you follow the Republican Creed. Here’s the last line of the Creed…”That faith in God, as recognized by our Founding Fathers, is essential to the moral fiber of the Nation.” One Founding Father, John Adams, said, “Our Constitution is made only for a moral and religious People. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.” Is faith in the Christian God (an essential ingredient in our government) something Libertarians are willing to accept? This obviously impacts some social issues.

    • Chuck Hansen

      Larry, I don’t accept the first part of your question: “Is faith in the Christian God (an essential ingredient in our government)”

      No, it is not.

      • Chuck Hansen

        I’m pretty sure Thomas Jefferson was a Founding Father. Let’s see what he had to say about your assertion about faith in the Christian God being an essential ingredient in our government…

        • Chuck Hansen

          “Among the most inestimable of our blessings is that … of liberty to worship our Creator in the way we think most agreeable to His will; a liberty deemed in other countries incompatible with good government and yet proved by our experience to be its best support.”– Thomas Jefferson, Reply to Baptist Address, 1807

          • Chuck Hansen

            “The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.” – Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, 1781-82

          • Chuck Hansen

            “ Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch toward uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one-half the world fools and the other half hypocrites. To support roguery and error all over the earth.“ – Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, 1781-82

          • Chuck Hansen

            ”I know it will give great offense to the clergy, but the advocate of religious freedom is to expect neither peace nor forgiveness from them.“– Thomas Jefferson, to Levi Lincoln, 1802. ME 10:305

          • Chuck Hansen

            “I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance, or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others.”– Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Dowse, April 19, 1803

          • Now he is speaking of organized CHristianity, not necessarily individual followers of Christ or Christians

        • Turbocohen

          fyi, from this jews perspective, saying Christian God and Judeo-Christian God means exactly the same thing and references the same God.. and said either way means exactly the same thing.. Judeo-Christian simply reads more inclusively. No harm done, keep calm.

          • David Dull

            Heck, even the Muslims recognize Christians and Jews as fellow “Children of Abraham”. All three religions share passages from the same book.

          • Chuck Hansen

            Careful David or you will violate the Republican Creed.

          • Chuck Hansen

            Turbo, I’m glad to hear that perspective. It is open-minded, in my opinion. However, from the Christian perspective, I’ve met many a “believer” who thought the “Judeo” in “Judeo-Christian” referred to the people who were half-right and therefore going to Hell (unfortunately, of course) for not believing in Jesus, but in the meantime they were happy to have Jewish votes if all it took was adding “Judeo” to “Christian.”

          • Chuck Hansen

            Hey Larry, sound like anyone you know?

          • Turbo, actually Jews and Trinitarian Christian worship two different Gods. Jews worship only the Father, and Trinitarian Christians worship One God who is made up of three persons: Father/Son and Holy Spirit

      • Laurence Nordvig

        Then you disagree with Adams and Washington

        • Chuck Hansen

          And you disagree with Jefferson. So what?

          • Laurence Nordvig

            Just think it’s interesting you picked the Founding Father who is considered the the most liberal, was a bitter enemy of Washington & Adams, is named the “Father of the Democratic Party”, and cut large portions of the Bible out and made up his own.

          • Chuck Hansen

            So what you meant to type originally was “One of the good Founding Fathers”. BTW, I guess you are disavowing that whole Declaration of Independence, since it was written in large part by one of the evil Founding Fathers?

          • Laurence Nordvig

            I actually wanted a serious discussion here. As a TEA Party leader and an officer in my GOP unit, I am interested to know the “limits” of GOP/Libertarian cooperation. Apparently, this web site is not the place to find that.

          • Alexis Rose Bank

            If you want serious answers, you have to talk to the cat – America is down the rabbit hole, after all.

            Here are the answers to your questions.

            1) We’re not cool with unnecessary use of military force and can generally be expected to view war as a tragedy that should be avoided.

            2) We want the drug war gone, and anyone who is particularly into it is going to be a show-stopping problem for us. The evidence is overwhelming and compelling that this policy has done the nation massive harm, and if you ever want to see blacks off the Democratic plantation – as we do – this is eventually going to be a requirement. So get used to the idea.

            3) If you want to be religious on your own dime, we’ve got your back. If you want to do it through the use of force (which is ultimately what government boils down to), we’ll be on the other side. When a sensible policy has religious roots, argue it to the general public on sensibility grounds not religious ones because the latter makes us facepalm and want to pretend not to know you – not necessarily because it is wrong factually, but because it is an unforced error tactically.

            4) Anything that undermines US sovereignty is a major no-no – this includes things like NAFTA, GATT, TPP etc.

            5) If you want to federalize a problem that could be handled on the state or local level, count us out. Ninth and 10th amendments are as meaningful as the others – either you take the Constitution for what it says or you don’t!

            6) If you think a war on Islam or terrorism is in the top 50 things America needs to concentrate on right now, you’re not with us. Learn what “blowback” is and consider national defense strategies that don’t require global military domination over the entire human race, nor spending more than the rest of the world combined – using borrowed money – on the military.

            I figure these won’t be problems in the long run, as the modern-day Tea Party is in fact a child of the Ron Paul 2008 campaign. I was a Tea Partier myself up until Glenn Beck hijacked it.

          • Can I use this quote and attribute it to you on some of my websites?

          • Alexis Rose Bank

            you are quite welcome to do so

          • David Dull

            There is no Republican/Libertarian cooperation. There is only Republicans of different philosophical thought coming together.

            How did you obtain your Tea Party and Republican leadership positions without understanding the difference between politics, religion and philosophy?

            I AM A REPUBLICAN. The only Republican/Libertarian cooperation would involve you reaching out to the Libertarian Party. Have you ever done that?

          • David Dull

            A “classic liberal” is no comparison to a modern day liberal, but more like the modern day libertarian. IN FACT, any who rebelled against King George would have been considered “liberal” compared to the “conservative” monarchy.
            Washington raised an army to crush a revolt against a 15% whiskey tax when he had finished winning a war started over a 3% tea tax. He later lamented his decision. He surrounded himself with a corrupt cabinet including Alexander Hamilton (who wanted to make Washington a king). Adams kept the same cabinet when he took office.

            Jefferson was no fool. He was asked to author the DOI for a reason and the Constitution of our great Commonwealth is is brainchild. Of course our constitution was the foundation of the United States Constitution that replaced Jefferson’s favorite: The Articles of Confederation (which is my favorite as well)

            Here endeth the history lesson 😉

          • ArthurLeeTalley

            Personally I liked what Jefferson was trying to do with his translation of the Bible. To take the mystical out of it and show the true value of Christ’s teachings.

          • Larry, Jefferson wasn’t the most liberal..he was the most libertarian..the most limited government OUT of all the Founders.

        • ArthurLeeTalley

          Adams and Washington were Deists. Most believed Atheists were ignorant fools. Of course with all your talk about your “Viking” heritage are you pagan?

          • Arthur and Larry, I disagree with both of you. Adams and Washington were NOT saying the Christian God was an essential ingredient in our government, just having a moral religion, AND Washington and Adams were not Deists but Christian. To say either is a complete fabrication.

            And to boot Washington and Adams were not really limited government guys, they were middlesized government guys.

    • David Dull

      Laurence,
      1. Most libertarians I know ARE Christian. Write that down.
      2. Are you seriously suggesting Jews, Muslims, Taoists, Buddhists, agnostics and atheists don’t belong in the Republican Party? I don’t normally throw the R card out on the table, but when the shoe fits, sounds like a bigotous statement to me.

      • Laurence Nordvig

        Relax David. You don’t need to attack. I’m just bringing up a point of discussion. As leader of a large TEA Party group, I work with Libertarians every day, and glad to do it. I am simply pointing out that the GOP Creed requires a belief in the Judeo/Christian God (obviously the God believed in by the FF’s). It’s just as much a part of the GOP Creed as limited government or fiscal responsibility. Are most young Libertarians willing to sign on to that? Otherwise, don’t those who do not believe in God (those with non-Judeo/Christian beliefs) belong in the Libertarian Party, as opposed to the GOP? I’m not saying people are not allowed to believe/not believe as they wish as American citizens. I’m only suggesting that the GOP Creed requires such faith. Should non-believers in God be members of the GOP any more than believers in big government or deficit-spending? (Not attacking anyone, not bigoted…a serious question). How big a tent do you set up before the Creed is meaningless?

        • Chuck Hansen

          First, the “Judeo” is a last-minute add on your part, Larry. Second, that is exactly one reason I DON’T belong to the GOP (not that I’m a *young* Libertarian). Third, in other posts in this thread, you’ve made it clear you are not just raising a discussion point, but positing that this faith in “the Christian God” is an essential ingredient in our government, per Adams and Washington, so this is not “just raising a question.” Which brings me to fourth, it is this kind of religious litmus testing that is creeping into the Tea Party (particularly as it morphs into the right wing of the GOP), and one reason I am not active in the Tea Party any more.

          • Chuck Hansen

            “I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance, or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others.”– Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Dowse, April 19, 1803

          • Eric McGrane

            Chuck: You said that you left the Richmond Tea Party because your workload at Capital One had grown too great to continue to be involved….never once did you mention “religion-creeping” as a reason. In fact, you rejected calls to get reengaged from years back when I attempted to pull you back in, so the timeline here isn’t adding up.

            There is no “religious litmus testing” creeping into the tea party, and its ludicrous to suggest that the TP is becoming a wing of the GOP. Ask Eric Cantor and Linwood Cobb what they think about your assertion.

            These kinds of claims are not accurate, and not helpful.

          • Chuck Hansen

            🙂 Love and respect you Eric, but you are incorrect. ONE reason I currently am not active in the Tea Party is the sort of comments that Larry made (which he is saying is really about starting a discussion… but read his initial post and you’ll see what he was really saying) along with interactions I had along the same lines with others in the RTP who shall remain nameless.That is ONE

          • Eric McGrane

            I understand what you are saying, but peoples personal beliefs are not the same as organizational focus or policy. I’d be happy to discuss any “religiosity” that you consider concerning, if you could find any….

            http://www.richmondteaparty.com/

          • Chuck Hansen

            I won’t get into the personal and career stresses that my work with the TP created. But suffice to say I make no apologies to anyone for my involvement when I was involved and my decision to pull back.

            That said, the religion-creeping issue was ONE of the reasons I pulled back. And in fact, I did mention the religion-creeping issue to you, in a long phone call, when discussing one of our leader’s determination to emphasize the bullshit Sharia Law issue and anti-Muslim crap he was pushing. And if you look at Larry’s original post, only an intellectually dishonest person could say that he (the leader of the RTP) was not pushing a “Christian God” line of argument.

            Regarding the TP being a wing of the GOP – the admirable besting of Cantor and Cobb by the TP occurred AT a GOP Convention. So… I’d say that’s becoming part of the GOP.

            But you are looking for helpful comments, so here’s one: it would be helpful if idiots like Ted Cruz were not appropriating the Tea Party brand for their own benefit, and driving ridiculous strategies like a government shut-down one week before Obamacare was scheduled to self-destruct. Cruz got lots of attention and donations, and the Obamacare debacle was pushed off the front page for two critical weeks.

        • David Dull

          I didn’t know I was upset. Thanks for calming me down. I wasn’t attacking you. I was pointing out the obvious. Even most Tea Party creeds include something about god. Are non-christians not welcome under your leadership?

          Libertarian: An American political party created by disenfranchised Barry Goldwater supporters in 1971.
          libertarian: a philosophical perspective centered around freedom.
          Please understand the difference and use proper grammar accordingly. Thank you.

          You answered my question with a question. But you need to reread the RPV creed. It says faith in God. It doesn’t say “the Christian God”. And lets be frank here, the big difference between Jews and Christians is the New Testimate, which “overrules” the Old Testimate. So that throws everything out of whack when the Old Testimate says to stone homosexuals to death while the New Testimate teaches peace, love and acceptance.

          But please, tell me, is the Republican Party reserved for only Christians? …and Jews according to you.

          “The most important one,” answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”
          Sounds pretty libertarian to me.

          • David Dull

            furthermore, my personal relationship with my spiritual adviser has nothing to do with you, the RPV or the Tea Party, nor is your relationship with your deity. “Judge ye not, lest ye be judged”

            Can we stop nitpicking about who believes in what god and whether their spirituality fits with each others as long as they recognize spirituality is essential to the moral fiber of humanity?

          • Eric McGrane

            David: I’ll posit that your assertion that “most tea party creeds include something about God” is highly questionable and not supported in evidence. So many people are falling for that constant media narrative that its becoming a “truism”.

        • Again Laurence, the Founders didn’t all believe in the Jewish or Christian God. ANd the Republican Creed and John Adams said a religious people, not a CHristian People. They chose their words carefully.

    • Laurence, the Founders didn’t all believe in the Jewish or Christian God. ANd the Republican Creed and John Adams said a religious people, not a CHristian People. They chose their words carefully.

    • Catholic Notions

      I am Catholic. Voted for Republicans, two Democrats that I regretted, and two independents that I have never regretted. I do not trust many Democrats nor Republicans these days. I do trust Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama. He’s the only Senator worth his weight in salt.

  • pinecone321

    I’ve looked here at The Bull Elephant to post something, just a little something to honor our fallen military members. Nothing, absolutely nothing, not the first post by anyone who posts articles here. Nothing. I can only guess that those that have posting priviledges here have no use, respect, or honor within them to even just acknowledge Memorial Day, and those that died for the freedoms this country has enjoyed prior to Obama. Done here, have at it.

    • Eric McGrane

      Really dude? Sometimes people are with families, away from the Internet. If you are “done here” over the absence of a Memorial Day mention, that’s simply amazing.

      • pinecone321

        Really? So everyone here was so busy with family activites that they can’t post a simple thank you to our Vets? Interesting that the Vets are so much less important than hot dogs and hamburgers. Do you think our military members were “warmongers” in uniforms?

        • Eric McGrane

          Don’t be an idiot.

          No one said that “our military members were “warmongers” in uniforms?” What is WRONG with you?

          • pinecone321

            The problem isn’t with me Eric, it is with you. I am not an idiot as I support every last one of our military members, ever last one of them. Were you ever in the military Eric? or were you to much of a ………………… finish the blanks yourself.

          • Eric McGrane

            See, now you’re demanding that I defend a topic that you fabricated. Yes, my special friend, I actually was deployed in the 2nd infantry division in Korea and was deployed in both Desert Shield and Desert Storm during the first gulf war.

            Now that I’ve embarrassed you, care to clarify how that hell you came up with “Do you think our military members were “warmongers” in uniforms?”

            I think you need to push away from the keyboard and get some fresh air.

          • Chuck Hansen

            Ouch pinecone.

          • Jeanine Martin

            My family has fought in every war this country has had, back before we were country too. We all strongly support our military.

          • David Dull

            EVERY veteran? Even the ones who were convicted of killing innocent men women and children and Nidal Hasan who fatally shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others at Fort Hood in 2009?

            Sounds like a blanket statement to me. Who are you “pinecone”?

        • Jeanine Martin

          Step away from the computer, you are losing it.

    • Jerry Benson

      pinecone: Totally reckless and unjustified charges. You could have used your space to do the very thing that you are complaining about … thank our vets.

      • pinecone321

        It wasn’t about me post. It was at least a little article, one sentence, something in thanking those that died for this country. I’m getting the feeling that our vets are considered more of a problem than they deserve.

        Thank you to all of our Veterans, and current military members in very dangerous areas in this world. Obama has let you down with his pansy azzed foreign policy, but he isn’t the only one that have let you down. Jane Fonda lives on, and so does Code Pink among others.

        • Eric McGrane

          I accept your gratitude, and would also accept your apology.

        • Alexis Rose Bank

          I make the best freshly grilled bacon cheeseburgers that ever existed, so there wasn’t a prayer in Hell that I’d be available on Memorial Day. I’m a hot commodity!

          • Jeanine Martin

            That’s exactly what I ate on Memorial Day too!

          • Alexis Rose Bank

            Save next year for the ARB Grrrrrrill – you won’t regret it!

        • Not just Obama let our troops down, but Bush let them down too!! When Bush and Obama send them into wars we NEVER should have started.

    • Jeanine Martin

      You are going to be so embarrassed tomorrow when you wake up and see what you wrote today. I feel bad for you and hope you feel better soon.

    • Pinecone, I generally enjoy your contributions here, but this is just nuts. a few points.
      1. We’re not a public utility. Sometimes we take time off.
      2. I actually tried to post a tribute, but ran into technical difficulties.
      3. I could have later posted something, but instead took my kids to Quantico National Cemetery (as I do every Memorial Day) to reinforce the object lesson of others’ sacrifice for our freedoms.
      3. I’m a proud veteran. As was my father, his father, and his grandfather. So take your accusation of us having “no use, respect, or honor” for veterans and shove it where the sun doesn’t shine.

  • pinecone321

    Steve Albertson, since you are in charge of this site, are you so cold and detached that you, as the site owner, couldn’t even thank our veterans, and those miliraty memebers that have died for this country that you couldn’t even post a little tiny post at least thanking them for their service. Rolling Thunder has it all over your cowardness.

    • Jeanine Martin

      Steve is a veteran! And cares more about our veterans and service men and women than anyone you know. There is nothing cowardly about him!

    • David Dull

      “pinecone”
      While hiding behind a made up name, do you believe you deserve a response?

    • Turbocohen

      Hey pinecone321, you aint nothing but the name dropping coward you accuse an honorable veteran like Steve of being.. And you offend others. Lets get back on topic here..

    • Danielle

      Okay, first and foremost, there is a difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

      You honor all Veterans on Veterans Day – both living and dead.

      You honor those who have fallen when answering the call to colors on Memorial Day.

      Second, if you didn’t notice where Steve was on Memorial Day, I can only say, reading is your friend. He was actively participating in honoring those who gave all and teaching valuable lessons to his children to carry forward in the process instead of just b*tching on a blog.

      Third, besides ranting here, did you do anything to honor those who have fallen?

  • David McKissack

    “Many fiscal conservatives I disagree with on social issues recognize one indisputable fact: the future of the Republican Party is in serious trouble!”

    And what’s more, David, the future of individual freedom, personal responsibility and Constitutional principles are threatened by continued Democrat reign. I welcome the opportunity to form common cause with Libertarians concerned about that threat, despite my being a long-time Republican and Christian who might disagree with them on social issues.

    First, we work together to retake Congress; without that first step, nothing else we do matters.

    Things might be different right now in Virginia if our General Assembly contained even ONE more Republican, whether they were tea party Republican, establishment Republican, or libertarian Republican.

    Who wants to be saying that about Congress come January 2015? Who’d prefer a Congress of 50 Dems and 50 Republicans over a GOP majority? Not me.

    • But, David, so many Republicans act just like Democrats like Eric Cantor and TAX HIKE Bob McDonnell, who had to beg the Democrats to raise our taxes.

      • David McKissack

        I don’t like Republicans who raise taxes and support amnesty either, Kirby, but if they give my party a majority, and control over things like committee chairmanships and memberships, and the deciding vote on issues we DO agree on, then I’ll take them, whether they are tea party Republican, establishment Republican, or libertarian Republican if the only other choice is letting the Democrat win.

        Because the Democrat party of today is a proto-fascist organization motivated primarily by the Will to Power. The days of reasonable, patriotic Democrats like Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Sam Nunn, etc, are over. We now have a President willing to try to intimidate the SCOTUS at his State of the Union Speech, willing to employ the IRS and NSA and DOJ to suppress dissent, willing to use a “pen and a phone” when he wants, a judiciary which thinks it’s entitled to create law and culture and runs rough-shod over the results of public referendum, an academia teaching American is evil, and a legacy press agreeing that those are good things. Far too few people on our side don’t comprehend this.

        It’s past time when all of us worried about these things should unite and stop trading barbs with each other.

        All rounds downrange, please.

        • And what has a Republican majority gotten us in Congress and Virginia? Nothing but bigger, stronger government and higher taxes over all.

          And what good is a majority IF it ids full of people who vote 80% with the Democrats on things that grow government, raise taxes and destroy our nation and our freedoms and liberties.

          Many of the protections of our liberties and chains on Government were removed when we had the White House, the Senate and the House.

          I am for a GOP majority of conservatives, not a GOP majority of liberals and moderates.

          The GOP is half of the proto-fascist organization motivated primarily by the Will to Power. The Dems being the other half.

          Many don’t realize that the pro-America that many GOP establishment including Bush is and was phony just to get votes from low information voters. And most don’t get that.

          • I think you’re both right. Kirby, in terms of “what has a Republican majority gotten us,” I’ll pose a different question, “How bad would we be off without having had a Republican majority?”

            I’m all for campaigning for the right guys in the primary/convention, and holding our electeds accountable, but David is right about not forgetting that we’re in a party–that means a coalition,and it means living with the fact that our leaders aren’t always going to give us what we want. We just keep working to nominate the best people we can, and then defeating the Democrats in the fall.

          • Steve, I agree with you that if you fight for the most conservative in the primary, and I agree that leaders won’t always give us want we want or be always be what we want.

            BUT that idea ends when I believe the one nominated is a liar and whose actions are destroying our nation and giving government more power to take our natural born liberties and selling us out to crony capitalists like Eric Cantor.

            I will never vote for him, ever again. I used to be a Cantor sheeple, until I started looking at his record.

          • David McKissack

            I’m with you on working to elect a GOP majority of conservatives, Kirby, and likewise that our party failed to follow limited government and pro-freedom principles during the Bush years. I share your frustration about that, but on the other hand, where in the Democrat party are the likes of Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Mike Lee, Marco Rubio, Mark Matthews, Trey Gowdy, and Louie Gomert?

            These men have stopped a rout by raising the flag and forming a rally point despite intense opposition within their own party, yet I doubt even one of them will refuse to work with moderates in the GOP caucus if that means legislative victories in 2015. And I’m absolutely certain none of them would tell us not to vote this fall if our only choice is a moderate or liberal Republican.

            So, as Steve writes — “We just keep working to nominate the best people we can, and then defeating the Democrats in the fall.”

          • And I will support electing the likes of likes of Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Mike Lee, Justin Amash and a few others. I think Marco Rubio is a fraud and an amnesty lover just like Eric Cantor. I’m not sure about Mark Matthews, Trey Gowdy and Louie Gomert. Haven’t really checked them out.

            And I will support any decent republican, even ones I have some differences with on minor issues. There are things I will overlook and things I will NOT over look.

            I repeat: BUT that idea ends when I believe the one nominated is a liar and whose actions are destroying our nation and giving government more power to take our natural born liberties and selling us out to crony capitalists like Eric Cantor.

            I will never vote for him, ever again. I used to be a Cantor sheeple, until I started looking at his record.

    • David Dull

      Libertarians belong to a politcal party
      libertarians have a philosophy of liberty for all.

      please use proper grammar accordingly. thank you

      • David Dull

        BTW: there are plenty of conservatives and libertarians in established positions. The world “establishment” has always seemed a tad silly to me.

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  • jory12

    Eric Cantor Opened the lIlegal Alien Floodgates

    http://www.conservativehq.com/node/17361

    Yes, conservatives and libertarians should unite to retire Eric Cantor on June 10.

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