SEISMIC SHIFT IN THE 7th: What does Cobb's ouster mean for the GOP?

There are a number of lessons to take away from today’s shocking defeat of one of Eric Cantor’s top lieutenants in his home district. The future of the GOP depends on whether its elected leaders are willing to learn.

First, what happened? For the uninitiated, it can be difficult to read through all the inside baseball stuff about “slating” and “mass meetings” and the “Party Plan,” etc., so I’ll cut right to the chase. The big story is that Rep. Eric Cantor’s right hand man in his district, who served as that district’s GOP chairman, was ousted today at the 7th District GOP Convention by an insurgent coalition of those disaffected by the chairman’s and Cantor’s grip on local politics.

Much, but not most, of the anger channeled into bringing about this ouster has to do with a preference among many grass roots activists for nominating candidates via conventions rather than consultant-driven open primaries. But at bottom, for most of those in attendance at the 7th District GOP convention this was about finally having a seat at the table inside the Republican Party.

The Role of the Tea Party
A friend remarked to me after Cobb’s defeat that what made this possible was the unique vitality of various Tea Party groups within the 7th District. I responded, “Do you think that’s a coincidence?” In fact, it is not, but is instead a direct consequence of the way Rep. Cantor and his supporters have consistently circled the wagons around the Congressman to ensure as much control of the local politics surrounding him as possible. Where in other districts, like the 1st District where I live, Tea Party and libertarian newcomers have been welcomed into the GOP tent, in the 7th they have consistently been made to feel unwelcome inside the GOP.

Where in the 1st District my Congressman, Rep. Rob Wittman, has consistently reached out to and engaged with local Tea Party groups, and where party leaders like 1st District Chairman Eric Herr have eagerly welcomed the new energy and vitality they bring to our own processes, in the 7th the reception has been much more of a “barbarians at the gate” affair. The contrast could not be more stark: in the 1st District there is relative tranquility among various components of the conservative coalition, while in the 7th there has been open warfare. That’s because if you keep shutting people out, sooner or later you’re going to have so many people on the outside with an axe to grind that shocking upsets like the one today become almost inevitable.

Cobb supporters rightly note that he ran a very tight ship, and that all the trains have run on time inside the 7th. I even have had people praise Cobb to me by pointing out the total harmony in his 7th District meetings: everyone agrees on everything. These folks, like those advising Cantor, fail to see the irony in that: sycophantic unanimity is more a symptom of a problem than a condition flowing from superior leadership.

The Ray Allen Problem

Fmr. 7th District Chairman Linwood Cobb (l) and top Eric Cantor strategist Ray Allen (r)
Fmr. 7th District Chairman Linwood Cobb (l) and top Eric Cantor strategis Ray Allen (r)
We’ve written before about Ray Allen, who is Eric Cantor’s top consultant and who has been the architect of a campaign this year to flip a number of district chairman seats to candidates friendly to Cantor—and friendly to the nominating primaries that make so much money for Allen. It’s time for Eric Cantor to fire Ray Allen, whose lack of acumen about how to handle intraparty politics since the rise of the Tea Party in 2009 has done nothing but put a huge target on Eric Cantor’s backside. The fact that Cantor has, for the first time really, a serious primary challenger in Dave Brat is no accident.

Neither is it an accident that the mainstream grassroots Republicans who teamed with Tea Party and libertarian activists to take down Linwood Cobb were particularly energized this year, given Allen’s “slating” campaign. As we’ve detailed extensively before, this involved essentially disenfranchising well over a thousand GOP activists in key jurisdictions around the state, using tons of paid staff working through the Cantor-affiliated 501(c)(4) group, YG Network and its local Virginia project, YG Virginia. The Ray Allen-engineered slating has done nothing more than vigorously poke a nest of already-angry hornets. And, despite the hundreds of thousands of dollars spent by Cantor forces on district chairman races so far this year, they have essentially NOTHING to show for it except an enraged Republican base: of the district chairman races this year, there is currently either a net loss of one for Cantor depending on the outcome of a disputed contest, or at best, a wash.

That’s not exactly a good investment of financial or political capital for Rep. Cantor. Worse, the local troubles Ray Allen spawned had already been part of the conversation among Cantor’s GOP colleagues in the House who are worried that if he can’t maintain relative peace at home, then as Speaker he’s unlikely to be able to manage the fractious collection of House Republicans and a hostile President. Today’s events will undoubtedly make the Speakership that much more tough for Cantor to gain. If I were Cantor, I’d be saying, “Thanks for nothing, Ray.”

What’s next for the Republican Party of Virginia?
Today’s shocker was much less a victory for the insurgent candidate, Fred Gruber, than it was a defeat for Cobb, Allen, and Cantor. Gruber is, after a fashion, the dog that caught the car.

That’s a problem going forward, as Gruber has a lot of work to do to prove himself capable to the other members of his committee, most of whom are utterly horrified at Cobb’s ouster. More broadly, the conservative coalition that got behind Gruber must be magnanimous, and cannot gloat or slip into vindictiveness. Further, they cannot campaign on inclusion and transparency and turn around and even think about shutting anyone out. Now that they’ve gotten their seat at the table, it’s time to practice what they preach, and work quickly and diligently to (a) prove they deserve to lead, and (b) start to heal what, as of now, are still-bleeding wounds. And, once things have settled down, I hope Gruber’s colleagues on the 7th District Committee can be open to working with him between now and November.

The outcome today has shocked the so-called establishment in Virginia’s GOP to its core. Likely nowhere is this shock felt more deeply than among the top backers of U.S. Senate candidate Ed Gillespie. It is unlikely that Ed’s team anticipated this big of an expression of anger and discontent among the grassroots activist base in the “establishment” bastion of the 7th District. I’m sure the reception Shak Hill received from those in attendance who favored Gruber over Cobb has not gone unnoticed by Gillespie’s team, and that they have grasped that Ed could actually lose at the June convention in Roanoke. Conversely, the events in the 7th District were a shot in the arm for Shak Hill, whose campaign has been flying under the radar with very little money and a shortage of staff and statewide organization. It would easy to read too much significance into this for the Senate race, but it should be a big warning sign for Gillespie.

More thoughts tomorrow, along with results from The Bull Elephant’s 7th District Straw Poll. We’ll also post details from the 5th District Committee’s overturning of slating in Campbell County.

About The Author

Steve is a lucky husband and proud father residing in Stafford, Virginia. A longtime Republican activist, he has served on the Republican Party of Virginia's State Central Committee since 2012. The opinions expressed here are his own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Virginia GOP.

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  • Eric McGrane

    Thanks for the comments Steve. I have my doubts about unity and coming together…there’s already quite a bit of hate out there from republicans. I’ve already learned that Gruber’s supporters are all rednecks and antisemites, for example. Yes, really.

    But there’s always hope.

    • Daniel J. Kline

      I’m sorry Eric, that you conclude that defeating a congressman’s buddy makes everyone of us ignorant racists. I do think you can do better than that.

    • Turbocohen

      I am a Gruber supporter.. hard sell to call me an antisemite..

    • http://thebullelephant.com/ Steve Albertson

      Yes, there’s always hope.

    • peeVee

      wow.

      This is what you call each other.

      wow.

      • Alexis Rose Bank

        GOP politics is not like Democratic politics – there’s actual room for differences of opinion.

        • Mark

          Truly. It’s like herding cats. Unlike the lemmings-over-the-cliff mentality of the left.

    • Jim Portugul

      Well Eric tell me this. If people do not vote for Eric Cantor because he is Jewish, they are what you call anti-Semites?

      Ok, then if someone votes for Cantor because he is Jewish, and the other candidate is not Jewish, but say Caucasian, shouldn’t that person be considered anti-Caucasion? Aren’t both racists?

      Doesn’t the two types of racist voters equal out in the end? Does it change the end result?

      But here is where the problem lies. If foreign aid is given to a country, and part of that aid gets funneled back and into a political party, PAC, or campaign, that can be real game changer! All legal mind you.

      Or, if a billionaire gives money to a political party, PAC, or campaign just because a country he had ties to gets billions in aid from the US, that could be a game changer. All legal mind you.

      I am not saying anyone is doing this, or anything illegal. Just say’in’

      As I have said many times, what is wrong with this country cannot be fixed without taking the money out of politics.

      Personally, I believe the Supreme Court rulings allowing more money to flow into politics and campaigns, were made by SCOTUS to help start and speed up a needed revolution. No proof, just a hunch.

      • Alexis Rose Bank

        Nobody cares what religion Cantor claims. Plain fact is, on policy, he is not representing us well, and that’s why there is opposition to him.

        Claims of antisemitism are nothing but FUD being thrown up by his compatriots. They are not claims to be taken seriously, and they diminish the credibility of those who falsely so accuse.

      • Eric McGrane

        I’m actually not obsessed with ethnicity or nationality…at all. Not sure why you’re asking me about the positions of those that attack me. Weird.

        • http://www.southsidecentral.com/ Bruce Hedrick

          That’s only semi-weird.
          This is full weird…

          Personally, I believe the Supreme Court rulings allowing more money to
          flow into politics and campaigns, were made by SCOTUS to help start and
          speed up a needed revolution. No proof, just a hunch.

          That guy just went on my nutball list.

          • Jim Portugul

            Thanks for your comments Bruce.
            Try this one out if you did not like my other SCOTUS comment/opinion.
            I have no proof, but I believe Chief Justice Roberts voted to uphold ObamaCare simply because he “owed” Pres. Obama for screwing up his first inauguration. Remember the swearing in? Now they are all even.
            I cannot prove it, but neither can you disprove it. Just my opinion.
            Regarding “closet liberals”. When Kaine left office, did he not leave McDonnell a proposed budget of about $75B?
            And now isn’t the budget passed by the Va. House about $96B? About 21B in just 4 years? Didn’t Comstock vote yea to these massive budget increases many times the cost of living index or rate of inflation?
            If the members of the General Assembly are not responsible for these increases, then who is? Does anyone think that Comstock will stop voting yea for big budgets when she gets to Washington? Why?
            Anyone who says they are for smaller government, less spending, but votes for massive budget increases is what I call a “closet” liberal. Massive budget increases generally call for massive tax increases, like HB2313. The largest in Virginia history.
            As for calling me a “nutball”, you just may be right!

      • Jeanine Martin

        No one gives a red rat’s ass what religion Cantor is. We care about what kind of conservative he is and so far he isn’t one.

    • Mark

      How constructive. Are you the type that votes fascist liberal democrat if your RINO doesn’t win his primary? Nurse your wounds and fight back next election as our constitution allows. Don’t derail a populist train fighting lobbyist money

      • Eric McGrane

        You evidently aren’t even reading the posts here. We’ve already clarified (right up there ^^^) that I was quoting someone else.

        • Mark

          Yours was at the top. some quotation marks would have been helpful. I see that you’ve caught quite a bit of flak thus far in the thread. thanks for the clarification.

          • Eric McGrane

            Fair enough. Edited to include quotes!

            Thanks for the feedback.

      • Lady_Penguin

        It’s a fine line between deciding to vote for the so-called “RINO” vs not voting at all, which, I assume, means that it’s a Dem vote then. Until recently, I always voted for the “R” never really thinking or believing that all was not well. Now, armed with more information, I won’t vote for a Republican without principles…no more than I would vote for the unprincipled Democrats.

        For years the GOP has used that argument – that we had to elect the “R” no matter what. I don’t agree with that mindset. As long as we keep electing RINO types, we get the Democrat version of governance. As far I’m concerned the RINO GOP can rot on the vine that’s growing it.

        • Mark

          Totally agree. No vote is simply not a vote. If you are to decide between the lesser of two evils, you still have to endorse evil. I agree with not electing unprincipled people. The biggest failure that can be contributed to our electorate is the “elect em and forget em” mentality we’ve had for many many years. They make a promise, and upon their arrival, are schmoozed by the establishment, and the next thing you know- we have democrats with R’s behind their name.

  • jamieradtke

    Absolutely excellent and balanced analysis.

  • Daniel J. Kline

    Excellent! For me, the part of this process that was most aggravating was the Ray Allen advertizing pieces. I sensed this was a factor for many other delegates when Cantor was shouted down when he started reciting the Ray Allen advertising lines. They seemed so phony after meeting and hearing Dave Brat.

  • Jeanine Martin

    Eric Cantor and Ray Allen are shaking in their boots tonight.

    • Turbocohen

      And I am shitting in their cornflakes.. Tell em to gobble it down fast and get it over with.

      • peeVee

        wow

    • http://www.southsidecentral.com/ Bruce Hedrick

      No. No, they’re not. Linwood Cobb was just collateral damage and cannon fodder to Eric Cantor.

      They’re going to sit back and wait for Gruber to make another “Nazi car” kind of mistake and then they’ll use their vast knowledge of the political process to put a trapdoor under him. They know how to play the game.

  • Jeanine Martin

    Great analysis Steve. I hope the Republican candidates across the state are paying attention. I love this line because it is so true, “sycophantic unanimity is more a symptom of a problem than a condition flowing from superior leadership.” All of the current candidates who are using Ray Allen (including Barbara Comstock) might want to rethink the advice that he has given them.

    • Jim Portugul

      Comstock? Here is a link to the bill Comstock introduced during the 2013 General Assembly, HB 1930. A bill that calls for annual tax increases for Virginia, every year, forever!

      http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?131+sum+HB1930

      Now, this is from her “Comstock for Congress” website,

      “As Our Common Sense Conservative Delegate, Barbara has worked to pass common sense conservative bills that provide tax relief to the middle class and small businesses. Barbara tirelessly worked to cut spending, eliminate red tape and to create jobs for Northern Virginia.”

      Now, hasn’t Comstock voted yes to every run away spending Virginia budget

      • Stephen Hollingshead

        Jim, the bill you link to is scored as a tax cut, not a tax increase. Why? Its aim is to prevent bracket creep. (Every year, inflation forces the real value of tax brackets lower and lower, effectively raising taxes.) By indexing the BRACKETS and STANDARD DEDUCTIONS to inflation, Barbara’s bill means that less money will come into state coffers.

        Obviously I have my differences with some of Barbara’s bills. But she should be commended for writing this one. It’s good economics, and good politics.

        • Jim Portugul

          Thanks for the response Stephen. I have heard that it has been described as “revenue neutral”.

          Who ranked it as a tax decrease? A decrease for which tax brackets? You are the first person that has ever told me that it is a decrease.

          And what about the state budget increases?

          • Stephen Hollingshead

            Jim, if you follow your link to the bill, click on the scoring part, and you see the negative revenues from the bill (in parenthesis).

            I agree with you on the spending part. Also, Virginia’s tax on business is 46% above the national average, which is very short-sighted. You’re right that we need to get the economy going, and a tax cut (particularly on businesses) would get more people employed, and–by increasing economic growth–bring even more money into government coffers.

          • http://www.southsidecentral.com/ Bruce Hedrick

            My problem with you is that you immediately jumped on something without understanding it carefully. You then started yelling and TYPING IN ALL CAPS!!! saying ridiculous things like “Comstock is nothing more than a “closet liberal”.

            After a small bit of factchecking shows that you are quite wrong, you fold with a Emily Litella-like “never mind”. Stunts like this blow what credibility you’ve built up to that point.

      • Jeanine Martin

        If Barbara is elected to Congress, and doesn’t vote as a conservative she will have to face a convention in two years. Because she was nominated by a party run process she does not have the option of a primary. She will have to face republicans in two years. She is fully aware of this.

  • strycat

    It isn’t just the Conventions vs Primaries issue. Gun owners have been upset with Cobb for refusing to move the Roundup from the anti-gun Innsbrook Pavilion.

    Other conservatives are tired of Cantor’s support of big government. This was a perfect way to give Cantor a smack on the wrist hoping he’ll get the message.

    Also Cobb had this in the bag when his candidate for temporary chairman, Loupassi, won. However Loupassi’s abuse of power cost some votes. At the very least the lie in the rules committee report (about a copy of the rules being given to every delegate) should have been corrected. About half the delegates didn’t get a copy of the rules. When I registered and asked if there were any handouts to go with my name badge, they looked at me as if I were a space alien.

    Only time will tell the Republicans will get their act together.

    • AmyH

      Cantor does not need a slap on the wrist… for our sake, he needs to be retired before he can “reach across the aisle” to get “immigration reform” passed.

  • Jeanine Martin

    This is an historic day for the Republican party in Virginia. The people have taken back their party.

    • pinecone321

      Even though I know us little people up here in the Orange don’t get much attention, the next one that needs to go is the Orange GOP chair. Doug Rogers.

      In the summer before the 2012 elections, the Orange GOP set up a table at the local annual fair. My better half and I visited the table to get the Romney/Ryan bumper stickers, even though Romney wasn’t out first, second, third or fourth choice for the nomination. Rogers was manning the table, and I said that I was very excited about Cuccinelli throwing his hat in the ring for the Gov. seat. Mr. Rogers, no not the sweater wearing one, turned almost white, turned around and literally stumbled away from us to stand and stare at nothing. No word of a lie. He refused to talk with us after our excitement over Cooch. Before that we had just given him all of our info., address, cell numbers etc., and asked what we could do to help. Never heard a word back from him.

      In a previous election period I called Rogers and volunteered to work at my polling location. He gave me a time and told me to meet him there, and that he would set me up with sample ballots to pass out. I waited for over an hour, and he never showed up.

      The GOP meetings for Orange are held at a gated community clubhouse. The website is updated about 2-3 times a year. There is no outreach for Republicans to join the local party at all. Oh, and I requested info. on when the next GOP meeting was to be held. I was never notified.

      • palintologist

        You need to call Russ Moulton.

      • Jeanine Martin

        Why would any community in Orange need to be gated? Like all gated communities, it’s silly and pretentious. Gated communities always seem to be in very safe areas. So what’s the point, other than being pretentious?

        • pinecone321

          That’s the point Jeanine. It’s meant to say “stay out of our protected enclave.” Shouldn’t GOP events, including their meetings be held in more accessible to the public venues?

          Lake of the Woods is not even in the town of Orange, it is about 20 miles from the town, with no bus or any other type of public transportation to get their. Inaccessibility is the key to the Orange GOP.

  • C Ken Davis Sr

    Good article. What I saw was the people of the seventh district fed up with the arrogance and manipulation done by current Republican leadership. I saw a resurgence of involvement and desire to replace those whose serve themselves rather than constituents. Even after Linwood Cobb and the Cantor camp attacked Fred relentlessly, the better man, Fred Gruber was given the position because we believe he will serve the district and the people in the district. Now the battle begins to finish the war and rid ourselves of Eric Cantor and his machine. June 10th we elect Dave Brat.

    • TRussert

      This not all that the “people” are fed up with either. Check out this unbelievable turn of events. https://mayone.us/

  • NVaTP Organizer

    I think that if one describes the rift between conservatives and the establishmentarians as merely a preference of nomination methods, one does not get to the root of the issue. The root issue is accountability, Tea Party activists and conservatives prefer to have a nomination method that holds the candidates accountable to the party and the values of the Republican creed. Establishmentarians prefer not to be accountable, and by this running the country into the ground.

    • http://thebullelephant.com/ Steve Albertson

      Well said. When a politician has to come back for renomination by a Convention, he’s much less likely to wander off the reservation while in office.

      • peeVee

        “wander off the reservation”

        Who’s “reservation”?!
        Yours?!
        You’re the minority in the Minority Party.

        • Jeanine Martin

          Wow. Conservatives are now the minority in the Republican Party? Looks like we’re about to make a comeback.

          • peeVee

            Yes, you are the minority in the Republican Party, because the GOP is so splintered between Libertarian, Conservative, Establishment, and Tea Party, and Neocon & while you may be the largest of those splinters, you still don’t ever get past 50%. I watched the Clown Car debates.

            of Cantor, Boehner, Mitt Romney, John McCain, GW Bush, Dick Cheney and the leaders of the recent GOP none are “Conservatives”. NONE

            Your “Conservatives” Palin, Aiken, Mourdoch, Mark Harris, Christine O’Donnell, Bachmann, Ryan, Rubio, Cruz, Parry, Cain will never be electable.

          • pinecone321

            Some of those that you mentioned are not electable for you because you wouldn’t vote for them. That reminds me of the ding bat in NY who said she couldn’t understand how Bush got elected as she didn’t know one person who voted for him.

          • palintologist

            Ah, I believe that was the infamous quote from the NYT movie critic Pauline Kael lamenting Nixon’s win.

          • pinecone321

            Thanks for the correction. The point was that some just can’t function outside of their own bubble. peevee seems to be of that mindset.

        • pinecone321

          It appears that you are a dance instructor with a specialty in Goosestepping.

          • http://nvatp.com NVaTP Organizer

            The “reservation” is the republican creed and the timeless principles enshrined in it.

            We Believe:
            That the free enterprise system is the most productive supplier of human needs and economic justice,

            That all individuals are entitled to equal rights, justice, and opportunities and should assume their responsibilities as citizens in a free society, That fiscal responsibility and budgetary restraints must be exercised at all levels of government,

            That the Federal Government must preserve individual liberty by observing Constitutional limitations,

            That peace is best preserved through a strong national defense,

            That faith in God, as recognized by our Founding Fathers is essential to the moral fiber of the Nation.

  • Lady_Penguin

    The nomination methods are obviously an issue to many, but for many it was experiencing the slating coup at our 2nd District Mass Meeting and the foul means/methods the “Establishment” local GOP (supported by Cantor YG) used to subvert a simple election by individual delegates for our 2nd District Chairmanship. That, for us, means we’re not going to support people like Wagner, Taylor, Stolle, etc. The slating attempts to takeover district chairmanships is too much of a reminder of the sleazy backroom political dealing going on in Washington DC today, and for which the Democrat Party is known for. Now, too, it’s apparent that the Establishment GOP with the likes of Cantor want to silence the people’s voices.

    Indeed, all politics are local.

    • Alan

      Bingo! Sometimes I feel like it’s us against the “Uniparty.”

  • vassar bushmills

    I like your reporting Mr Albertson. Well said.

    • pinecone321

      OMG, it’s vassar bushmills. Hope all is well with you and that you are still putting the bop in the bop she bop. Unfortunately we have the Rama Lama Ding Dong in the WH. Great to see you again. Scope.

      • vassar bushmills

        Hi, Dearie. It’s been awhile. BullElephant must be in your neighborhood. Cantor having a rough go of it, and I expect, even if he wins, he loses in DC next term. Look for new leadership. Best regards, as always, Come vist us at UP if time allows.

        • pinecone321

          New Republican leadership is critical in both the House and the Senate. Apparently Eric Cantor thinks Washington should work the same way as the Republican establishment has in VA. Get in line, prove your loyalty, and when it’s your turn to go, as Mr. Albertson said, we’ll circle the wagons for you. Too bad Cooch didn’t get the same respect and support for his years of loyalty.

          • vassar bushmills

            Cucc went directly to the people, which this Albertson fellow has written so well about, and Cantor leant one of his best people to work for McAuliffe. I think a trend is emerging that establishment GOP can be relied onto work for the Dems rather than give the state, or the country, back to the people. We’ll see. Laisser les bons temps rouller.

  • peeVee

    It is obvious the GOP does NOT have a consistent Ideology.
    Republicanism plus Conservatism plus Libertarianism plus Tea Party mixes up into unintelligable mush.

    Y’all just like yer money.

    • http://thebullelephant.com/ Steve Albertson

      And Democrats like YOUR money.

      • peeVee

        that’s quite a dodge….

        You evaded the point.

        • Janine Woods

          The GOP claims to be the big tent party. If so, there should be plenty of room for all types. It’s much better than the phony liberal democrats who claim to be so “tolerant” with their “coexist” bumper stickers. They are truly rigid in thought, and expect everyone to think alike. It seems to the dems that the only accepted free speech is theirs.

          • peeVee

            that’s plain nonsense.

            …and one messed up “Big Tent”; one pole moving to the right and one even further to the right, a third just spinning in place; the 4th pole was made of rubber..

            and the point is that Republicans will embrace BOTH sides of an issue such as Immigration; GOP businesses brought the Mexicans here (see Herman Cain’s Restaurant Association); and now y’all are the loudest shouting “NO AMNESTY for ILLEGALs”, while they pick your crops.

            It’s called “Duplicity”.

          • Janine Woods

            It’s much better to have diverse thoughts than to be mindless sheeple.

          • peeVee

            Only Republicans sign Oaths and Pledges.
            See Grover Norquist.

    • David McKissack

      Yet, at this point, the GOP and its uneasy coalition are all that’s holding back the lawless, proto-fascist ideology of the contemporary Democrat party; and that is why liberty loving Americans are nevertheless willing to channel their energy into it.

  • kelley

    are Establishment Republicans those that hold office?

    • ConstitutionTeaParty

      They are GOPers who enjoy the status quo of big federal government. It is usually their livlihood.

      • Alexis Rose Bank

        That is an excellent, succinct definition.

      • peeVee

        When the GOP held ALL three branches of Government, they grew the size of the Government with DHS, they took away your ‘freedom’ with the poorly named “Patriot Act”, and they blew up the budget from a surplus to a Ten Trillion Dollar Deficit, while starting a war that benefited no one.

        and I hope you remember that during that time, the fight against Gay Marriage, the CHAIRMAN of the RNC was a gay man.

        Y’all are full of bluster and EMPTY on principles.

        • AmyH

          Are you really so limited in understanding that you cannot think of reasons that are non-homophobic to not support gay marriage. Reasons like at its base, marriage is a covenant between God, a man and a woman. Reasons like this expands the idea of “rights” and “protected classes” of people in a way that has already lead to a restriction in people’s religious freedoms explicitly guaranteed by our Constitution. The Bible says homosexuality is sinful and yet Christian business owners are being forced by courts to either close their businesses or provide services for “gay marriage” ceremonies that they find morally repugnant (and ought to be able to not participate in in a free society whether or not you personally agree with their moral compass.)

          • peeVee

            you have it backwards.
            but go on.

          • AmyH

            “you have it backwards” is not a counterargument.

            I pointed out two reasons why a “principled” homosexual man of good conscience and reasoning skills might not support the gay marriage movement (beyond the hypocrisy that you posited as a reason).

          • peeVee

            wow.
            That is astounding.

            You are so far off the map of reason.

          • kelley

            but if we want the government out of our lives, why would we want the govt to outlaw gay marriage?

          • AmyH

            Gay marriage is already outlawed in most states unless there is federal court intervention that imposes a “right” to gay marriage. I personally would like to see the government get out of the marriage business altogether since it is essentially a religious covenant (I would also like to see the tax code changed so that individuals are treated the same regardless of their marriage status since married couples now pay more taxes than two single people filing under otherwise identical circumstances). I don’t object to people being treated equally under the law (civil unions for all homosexual or straight if they want tax and inheritance privileges that are essentially state imposed) … I do object to people being able to force other people to provide services (wedding photography and cakes) for unions that they find morally repugnant. I object even more to the specter of the Government forcing churches to bless unions that are specifically and explicitly condemned in their religious texts. In essence, the parts of the practice of homosexual marriage that I object to have been, in some federal jurisdictions, directly imposed by the Government.

          • palintologist

            Actually, there are strong reasons to keep marriage in the govt purview as you’ll see in this piece from The Federalist:

            http://bit.ly/RiT4h7

          • AmyH

            Thanks for the link… I will read and consider :-)

          • Doug Brown

            Point #6 is worth an article by itself

          • pinecone321

            The question of gay marriage was put on the ballot for the state’s voters to vote on, and gay marriage was voted against in about 37 states. The state governments, with Eric Holders blessing is overturning the will of the people. Here in VA., as you know, two gay couples have successfully manged to have their wishes honored by a liberal appointed judge, which goes against the will of the majority of the people. The very same is happening in other states. The will of the few, or even one is overturning the will of the majority.

          • peeVee

            um, in North Carolina, they put that Initiative 1 in a PRIMARY ballot, that was almost entirely a Republican Primary 2012. (Obama had already obviously been chosen) Oh, they got away with it, but to insinuate that this ‘initiative’ got a chance at a fair election is hogwash.

            the GOP didn’t have the Cajones to put this in the General Election just 5 months later.

          • Jeanine Martin

            How about the simple fact that gay marriage is a social experiment that will effect children. Every social experiment endorsed by liberals over the last 50 years has hurt children and their families. Their track record for social experiments has been dismal. Why support another such experiment foisted on society by liberals?

          • peeVee

            every child born is a social experiment.

            You continue to make nonsensical assertions like:

            “Every social experiment endorsed by liberals over the last 50 years has hurt children and their families.”

            That’s utter nonsense.

          • AmyH

            My list was not all-inclusive so add on as you see fit:-)

        • Jeanine Martin

          What’s the gay Chairman got to do with anything? Yes, you are right about Establishment Republicans, they do all of those things you mentioned, that’s why we don’t support them!

          • peeVee

            You support them every time you go out and vote for a Republican.

            The Gay Chairman goes to the Duplicitous nature of your ‘principled’ Party.
            the GOP was using GayOphobia to rally the Christian base at the same time it was turning a blind eye to what was going in at the TOP.

            it was a con job and you fell for it..

          • pinecone321

            So what you are saying is that your voice in support of gay marriage is more important than the beliefs of Christians that support traditional marriage between one man and one woman. How tolerant of you.

          • peeVee

            they’re equal.

        • pinecone321

          Just to clear up one fallacy, Clinton didn’t balance the budget. He removed Social Security as a line item on the budget which then made it appear that the budget was close to being balanced. He moved the SS liabilities, along with the lockbox IOU’s into their own separate accounting area, and away from the budget.

    • Jeanine Martin

      No! Those who represent me in Richmond, Senator Dick Black and Delegate Dave LaRock are NOT Establishment Republicans. They really do support smaller government and less government intrusion in our lives. Along with Delegate Bob Marshall, they never support tax increases or the expansion of government. They also support the rule of Law. Establishment Republicans often do not support any of those things. They want bigger government, more government programs, more government interference in our lives, and they do not support the rule of law. For instance, Eric Cantor wants amnesty for those who have violated our laws.

      • peeVee

        that’s nonsense.
        y’all are really stuck inside your bubble.

        • Jeanine Martin

          Gotta love your non arguments, but thanks for playing.

    • pinecone321

      A little refresher course on the Country Class vs. the Ruling Class-

      http://spectator.org/articles/39326/americas-ruling-class-and-perils-revolution

  • ConstitutionTeaParty

    If Cantor dropped his pro-amnesty position it might hep unite the party. Why would any GOPer tackle immigration with ObamaCare and Benghazi as full force issues? Stupid!!

    • Jeanine Martin

      This ^^^^. As long as Eric supports amnesty, he will not get the support of rank and file republicans.

      • peeVee

        In NC, the GOP Supermajority just made it EASIER to use ILLEGAL Mexican laborers by extending the e-verify from 90 days to nine months; the length of a growing season.

        They are calling themselves “Conservatives”…. Thom Tillis.

        He will get support of ‘rank and file republicans’.

        see Duplicity.

        The Majority of Republicans want Mexican Labor to remain illegal and to be exploited.

        • Jeanine Martin

          Republicans like Eric want that because they are backed by the Chamber of Commerce. Rank and File republicans do not support illegals because they understand the impact they have on jobs and wages. Big business wants it to continue and big business supports politicians like Eric Cantor.

    • palintologist

      Because he’s getting “accolades” from the Chamber of Commerce. He and the CoC don’t mind us footing the bill for all the Amigos Grande already here and streaming in hour after hour.

    • Alan

      The immigration hysteria is a media and Democratic Party construct. But many republicans are so ensconced in the DC bubble they think it’s a real issue.

      • BrettD

        Yes. I don’t buy that Tyson and Dole qualify as the driving “big business” in the USA and/or GOP. The fact that Zuckerberg wants lots of foreign tech people is really a strong GOP argument for Parental School Choice and the failure of current cinderblock-style education.

  • Dana Smith

    Excellent article. It is important to note the after the Henrico Mass Meeting when Tea Party backed Russ Moulton was elected temporary chairman he could have slated the establishment GOP, ensuring a Fred victory. To his credit, and those who supported him, we did not slate anybody. If the intent was exclusion, it would have started then.

    I trust Fred and his supporters will continue to take the high road and unite the GOP in the 7th district.

  • Joanne

    Eric Cantor are you hearing us now! Would you like some more tea! We Americans are planning to take our country back, so get ready! We are not sitting back and letting you take over our country with the rest of the rhinos! We are conservative constitutionalist and we are going to make sure our representatives abide by the Constitution. So sit back because the pushes on. When you declared war on the teaparty, you declared war on the Americans! Congratulations to Fred Gruber. Mr.Cobb’s lowlife lies during your campaign were typical of the Democrats. It shows what extent Eric Cantor and his cronies would go to to win, Hats off again to Fred Gruber.

    • peeVee

      ” We Americans are planning to take our country back,”

      Y’all should listen to yourselves…
      Full of bluster and baloney.
      Y’all aint gonna fix ANYTHING while you allow the thieves in the GOP to keep power.

      • Jeanine Martin

        Huh? Have you not been paying attention?

      • Joanne

        P wee, think again, we are planning to take our country back and we can do without you!

  • kelley

    someone on this thread said that all incumbents should be re-nominated to run for re-election by convention to “keep them from going off the reservation.” OK, here is why that might not be a good idea. Take Morgan Griffith for example. He won in 2010 in an absolute squeaker. If he had a contentious & divisive convention for his re-nomination, the Dems might get the idea that he was weak & mount a nationally funded campaign against him.

    • kelley

      conventions do not always nominate the strongest candidates. we need to keep last year in mind when touting all the great things about conventions.

      • Jeanine Martin

        Conventions give the people a chance for their voices to be heard, without the big bucks that control primaries. I will never give up my support for conventions and for those who care to have a say in the nominee. Without conventions, the Establishment and their money wins it all.

        • pinecone321

          Agree Jeanine. I prefer conventions over primaries as well. If Virginia closed their primaries, I might feel more positive about primaries. I prefer not having Democrats pick out nominee. Conventions are much more expensive to run. Primaries take much needed campaign donations away from the candidates

          • http://thebullelephant.com/ Steve Albertson

            Actually, pinecone, conventions have traditionally been a huge fundraising opportunity for the party, not a money-loser. We made a great deal of money off the 2013 convention that funded RPV operations for many months. Granted, we lost money in 2009, but that’s a whole other story.

          • pinecone321

            Mr. Albertson, my bad. I meant to say that conventions are much cheaper to run than primaries. Sorry for the mistyping.

      • pinecone321

        McDonnell, Bolling and Cuccinelli were nominated via convention in 09. I don’t remember hearing anyone beeitching about those nominees. IOW, conventions are great if I get the nominee of my choice but, if my guy doesn’t win then conventions suck.

      • palintologist

        The last convention sucked win because the establishment ran it. They HATE conventions and want all the attendees to as well. That poorly run fiasco was no accident.

    • palintologist

      The establishment GOP has no problem getting their friends across the aisle to come out and vote for RINOs since VA has open primaries. That’s how they keep winning.

  • Richmond Republican

    The results of this meeting had at best only a little to do with what type of nomination process should the party be using and when. It was much more philosophical and it reflects above all the virulent anti-Washington sentiment that cuts across a lot of lines.

    • Lady_Penguin

      That is exactly the point the Establishment GOP is missing this election cycle and most assuredly into the 2016 elections. The dark shadow hanging over ALL DC politicians, IMO, is that Obamacare – with its hit on people’s personal income, for less care and access, along with the disaster it has wreaked on the economy and jobs, is going to get both political parties. No matter how much the GOP proclaims they didn’t sign the bill (and they didn’t, but they’ve been enablers to the monstrous grab for federal power) the people aren’t going to be selective in the blame game. It will simply be a matter of 1994 all over again, and the absolutely appropriate slogan of “throw the bums out.”

  • JudsonPhillips

    Anyone know if there is a link to either audio or video of Cantor being booed?

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  • Lady_Penguin

    The danger Cantor et al., don’t see (my comment below about the adverse effects of Obamacare on BOTH political parties) is this: the GOP is going to find out that people are no longer going to blindly pull the lever for the guy with an “R” after their name. Those days are long gone. Will the GOP be angry if folks ‘stay home’? Guess so. Lose to the Democrat? Possibly. But with the wholesale enabling by the GOP for the Democrats’ agenda – what more do we have to lose?

    As far I’m concerned the RINO GOP can rot on the vine that’s growing it.

  • gene1357

    The victorious cabal operatives here obviously are ready to forfeit the Rebublican Party majority in the US House of Representatives.
    Those delegates, who in this instance have chosen to become GOP members just now, for the first time ever, are minions and shills. They act at the direction of pseudo-conservative statist puppet masters.
    Conservatives lost out to the statists in the 7th. Both GRUBer and bRat are Statists, not conservatives.
    We anti-statist conservatives await the primary for resolution. In any event, ethical conservatives will never surrender.

    • jory12

      Nice try Eric. We know you have lots of money to hire shills to post these silly posts that fool no one. Statist? Is that the best you could come up with. Yawn.

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  • pinecone321

    “The NRCC has moved 10 candidates to ‘Young Gun’ status, the top designation in their candidate training program.”

    http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/house-races/205827-nrcc-names-10-to-young-guns-program

    Barbara Comstock is one of the ten.

    • Jeanine Martin

      Fascinating.

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  • Jeanine Martin
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  • alaanile

    The question of gay marriage was put on the ballot for the state’s voters to vote on, and gay marriage was voted against in about 37 states. The state governments, with Eric Holders blessing is overturning the will of the people. Here in VA., as you know, two gay couples have successfully manged to have their wishes honored by a liberal appointed judge, which goes against the will of the majority of the people. The very same is happening in other states. The will of the few, or even one is overturning the will of the majority.

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    نقل اثاث بالدمام

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    ابي وايت صرف صحي بالرياض

    here

    here

  • alaanile

    The question of gay marriage was put on the ballot for the state’s voters to vote on, and gay marriage was voted against in about 37 states. The state governments, with Eric Holders blessing is overturning the will of the people. Here in VA., as you know, two gay couples have successfully manged to have their wishes honored by a liberal appointed judge, which goes against the will of the majority of the people. The very same is happening in other states. The will of the few, or even one is overturning the will of the majority.

    here

    here